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  • Flowmeters

    Flow measurement for liquids, gases and steam, applications for Water, natural gas, steam, mineral oil, chemicals are some of the fluids that have to be measured of Food & Beverage, Pharmacy sanitary industry and other traditional industry.

Product overview for applications in liquids, gases and steam
Consistent product quality, safety, process optimization and environmental protection – these are only a few reasons why industrial flow measurement is becoming more important all the time. Water, natural gas, steam, mineral oil, chemicals are some of the fluids that have to be measured day in, day out. There is no single, across-the-board technology suitable for all these applications, so you can choose the flowmeter best suited to your process needs from our comprehensive product.

Coriolis mass flowmeters

The Coriolis measuring principle is used in a wide range of different branches of industry, such as the life sciences, chemicals, petrochemicals, oil and gas, food, and – no less importantly – in custody transfer applications. Coriolis flowmeters can measure virtually all fluids: cleaning agents, solvents, fuels, crude oil, vegetable oils, animal fats, latex, silicon oils, alcohol, fruit solutions, toothpaste, vinegar, ketchup, mayonnaise, gases or liquefied gases.
Coriolis flow measuring principle
Each Coriolis flowmeter has one or more measuring tubes which an exciter causes to oscillate artificially. As soon as the fluid starts to flow in the measuring tube, additional twisting is imposed on this oscillation due to the fluid‘s inertia. Two sensors detect this change of the tube oscillation in time and space as the “phase difference.” This difference is a direct measure of the mass flow.


In addition, the fluid density can also be determined from the oscillation frequency of the measuring tubes. The temperature of the measuring tube is also registered to compensate thermal influences. The process temperature derived from this is available as an additional output signal.

Electromagnetic flowmeters

Electromagnetic flow measurement is a well-established method, this method is applicable for all conductive liquids, such as water, acids, alkalis, slurries and many others. Typical applications are monitoring of fluids, filling, dosing and precise measurement in custody transfer. need no maintenance and offer seamless system integration into your processes.
Electromagnetic flow measuring principle
Faraday’s law of induction states that a metal rod moving in a magnetic field induces electrical voltage. This dynamo principle also governs the way electromagnetic flowmeters work.


As soon as the electrically charged particles of a fluid cross the artificial magnetic field generated by two field coils, an electric voltage is induced. This voltage, tapped by two measuring electrodes, is directly proportional to the velocity of flow and thus to the flow volume.


The magnetic field is generated by a pulsed direct current with alternating polarity. This ensures a stable zero point and makes the flow measurement insensitive to multiphase or inhomogeneous liquids, as well as low conductivity.

Ultrasonic flowmeters

Using ultrasonic waves, the flow volume of a wide variety of gases and liquids can be measured reliably – independent of electrical conductivity, pressure, temperature or viscosity.
In applications that require traceable and guaranteed accuracy, inline ultrasonic sensors are preferred for use. Clamp-on ultrasonic sensors, on the other hand, are installed on the outer wall of the pipe and thus also enable temporary measurements or a retrofitting. Clamp-on sensors and In-line sensors option.
Ultrasonic flow measuring principle
Swimming against the flow requires more power and more time than swimming with the flow. This simple fact is the basis for ultrasonic flow measurement according to the “differential transit time” method: This method uses two sensors, set opposite each other in the measuring tube. Each sensor can alternately transmit and receive ultrasonic signals, while simultaneously measuring the signal transit time.


As soon as the fluid in the tube starts to flow, the signals are accelerated in the direction of flow but delayed in the opposite direction. The differential transit time, measured by the two sensors, is directly proportional to the flow rate.

Vortex flowmeters

Vortex flowmeters are used in numerous branches of industry to measure the volume flow of liquids, gases and steam. Applications in the chemicals and petrochemicals industries, for example, in power generation and heat-supply systems involve widely differing fluids: saturated steam, superheated steam, compressed air, nitrogen, liquefied gases, flue gases, carbon dioxide, fully demineralized water, solvents, heat-transfer oils, boiler feedwater, condensate, etc.

Vortex flow measuring principle
This measuring principle is based on the fact that turbulence forms downstream of obstacles in the flow, such as a bridge pier.


Inside each vortex flowmeter, a bluff body is therefore located in the middle of the pipe. As soon as the flow velocity reaches a certain value, vortices form behind this bluff body, are detached from the flow and transported downstream. The frequency of vortex shedding is directly proportional to mean flow velocity and thus to volume flow.


The detached vortices on both sides of the bluff body generate alternately a local positive or negative pressure that is detected by the capacitive sensor and fed to the electronics as a primary digital, linear signal.
Thermal mass flowmeters

Whenever high turndown or low pressure losses are important in gas metering applications, thermal mass flowmeters offer a real alternative to traditional measuring techniques – whether for process control, consumption and supply monitoring, detecting leaks or monitoring distribution networks. Using insertion versions, it is also possible to measure gas flows in very large pipelines or in rectangular ducts.
The thermal measuring principle is widespread in industry and is being used successfully in many applications with gas flow, for example:
Compressed air (consumption, distribution)
Carbon dioxide (for beverage production and chilling)
Argon (in steel production)
Nitrogen and oxygen (production)
Natural gas (for burners and boiler feed control)
Air and biogas measurement (e.g. in wastewater plants)



Thermal flow measuring principle
This measuring principle is based on the fact that heat is drawn from a heated body when a fluid flows past.


A thermal flowmeter contains two PT100 temperature sensors for this purpose. One sensor measures the current fluid temperature as a reference. The second sensor is heated and has a constant temperature differential relative to the first sensor at “zero flow.”

As soon as the fluid begins to flow in the measuring tube, the heated temperature sensor cools off due to the fluid flowing past – the higher the flow velocity, the greater the cooling effect. The electric current required to maintain the temperature differential is thus a direct measure of mass flow.
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